FAQs

If you have any questions not answered on the FAQ page or on our web site, please e-mail or call us and we will be happy to answer them.

Autism Assistance Dogs

Q: What is the status of the Autism Assistance Dog Program?
A: Dogs for the Deaf’s Autism Program is currently on hold and under review. We encourage you to learn more at http://www.dogsforthedeaf.org/autism-assistance-dogs/

Career Change Dogs

Q: What does it cost to get a Career Change Dog?
A: There is no charge to receive a Career Change Dog.

Q: How do I apply for a Career Change Dog?
A: Please visit our Career Change Dogs page to download and print out an application, then fill it out and send it in. You may also use the handy webform on the Career Change Dogs page to request an application be sent to you by mail.

Hearing Dogs

Q: What does it cost to get a Hearing Dog?
A: There is a $50.00 application fee. When an applicant has been approved to receive a Hearing Dog and is ready to be placed on the waiting list, we require a $500.00 Good Faith deposit, which is returned after the person and the Hearing Dog have been together for one year.

Q: What sounds are the dogs trained to respond to?
A: Dogs are trained to respond to a variety of household sounds, including: the doorbell/knock, smoke alarm, alarm clock, telephone, name call, and oven timer.

Q: Can you certify my dog for public access?
A: We do not certify dogs that we have not trained.

Q: Why would a person who is deaf need a dog in public?
A: Deafness is invisible and many people feel more secure and confident in public with their dog beside them. The dog helps others realize that the person is deaf and might need help in an emergency and that a bit of extra effort may be necessary in order to communicate with the person. By paying attention to the dogs natural reactions to the world around it, the person may gain greater environmental awareness.

Q: Are the Hearing Dogs trained in ASL (American Sign Language)?
A: No, they are not. Our dogs are trained to sounds and to alert their hearing impaired partner to sounds in the home, such as a door knock, oven timer, doorbell, telephone, smoke alarm, and even a baby’s cry. If the person signs, the dog will learn it very quickly. We do teach obedience commands with voice and hand signals.

Q: What is the age requirement to be considered for a Hearing Dog?
A: We generally do not place Hearing Dogs with children under the age of 18.

Q: How long do people typically wait before a Hearing Dog is placed?
A: Currently, the expected wait time is approximately a year.

Q: Why is your waiting list so long for a Hearing Dog?
A: Right now we have former clients on our waiting list. These are people who already have had one or more of our Hearing Dogs. Previous clients go to the top of the list for a new dog since they are accustomed to having the benefits of a specially trained dog. We are working on plans to expand our facility so that we will have more kennel space and additional staff so that we can train more dogs, as the demand continues to increase as more and more people realize the miraculous improvements they can have in their lives by having a professionally trained dog to help them.

Q: How do I apply for a Hearing Dog?
A: Before applying for a Hearing Dog, you need to decide if you would benefit from having a Hearing Dog in your life. Please review the Application Process section of our website. After reviewing the application process, application requirements and points to consider, if you would like an information and application packet, you may request to have one sent to you using the convenient webform on the Application Process page.

Program Assistance Dogs

Q: What does it cost to get a Program Assistance Dog?
A: There is a $50.00 application fee. When an applicant has been approved to receive a Program Assistance Dog and is ready to be placed on the waiting list, we require a $500.00 Good Faith deposit, which is returned after the person and the Program Assistance Dog have been together for one year.

Q: What is a Program Assistance Dog trained to do?
A: Program Assistance Dogs are trained to be calm and relaxed regardless of what is going on around them. These dogs must remain quiet in order to help calm clients and patients of professionals who work with children and adults who have challenges, or have disabilities. The dogs are trained to go to clients or students on command to help ease anxiety. Dogs can also be used as a reward for positive behavior.

Q: How do I apply for a Program Assistance Dog?
A: Before applying for a Program Assistance Dog, you need to decide if you would benefit from having a Program Assistance Dog in your life. Please review the Application Process section of our website. After reviewing the application process, application requirements and points to consider, if you would like an information and application packet, you may request to have one sent to you using the convenient webform on the Application Process page.

Q: What is the age requirement to be considered for a Program Assistance Dog?
A: Applicants must be adults who work with people who have physical, mental, or emotional challenges or disabilities. This could include: full-time physicians, teachers, counselors, and licensed therapists or counselors.

Q: How long do people typically wait before a Program Assistance Dog is placed?
A: Ideally, most Program Assistance Dogs are placed within 12 months from the time an applicant is approved, depending on a number of factors.

General Information

Q: How are dogs and people matched?
A: Each applicant must go through a thorough screening and application process. Once chosen to receive a dog, the applicant is matched with the appropriate dog based on lifestyle, living situation and personality.

Q: Where do you get the dogs that you train?
A: Most of our dogs come from shelters and humane societies in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and California. Our trainers visit the shelters on a regular basis looking for dogs. By using shelter dogs, we are able to help alleviate some of the vast population of homeless dogs. These dogs are then trained and placed in loving homes.

Q: At what age do you start training the dogs?
A: The majority of the dogs we choose from the shelters are between 10 months and 3 years of age.

Q: How long does the training take?
A: Generally, the dogs are in training from 4-6 months.

Q: What are the selection criteria for the dogs you train?
A: The basic things we look for are confidence and friendliness. These traits are important for training and critical for a dog which may accompany our clients into public places. We use dogs of all sizes and love to find dogs that love toys and treats.

Q: How are the dogs trained?
A: The dogs are trained with positive reinforcement. The trainers reward good behavior and ignore undesirable behavior.

Q: How can I become a trainer?
A: The Apprentice Trainer position is 3 year program working with the Certified Canine Instructors on staff. After attaining the needed skills and passing the Certification Test, the Apprentice Trainer becomes a Certified Assistance Dog Instructor. Excellent communication skills and teamwork are required. The ability to communicate in sign language is preferred. Please e-mail us for a job description and an application. You may also visit our Careers page, where we post any current job openings, to download and print a job application.

Q: What are the dogs trained to do?
A: The dogs are trained to do different things, depending on the person’s disability and needs.

Q: Can you train the dog to do specific tasks for the person?
A: Yes. All dogs receive the same basic training and then each dog receives specialized training depending on the person’s needs. This way, each dog’s training is customized to the needs of the applicant.

Q: Can you certify my dog for public access?
A: We do not certify dogs that we have not trained.

Q: What does the dog have to do in order to graduate from the program?
A: They have to be obedience trained and trained in the skills needed by the client they are being placed with. They must perform their skills reliably and regardless of any distractions around them. Those dogs that will be going into public places must pass the Public Access Test from Assistance Dogs International.

Q: What happens to dogs that are not able to complete the training?
A: Dogs that are not able to complete Hearing Dog, Autism Assistance Dog or Program Assistance Dog training become adoptable “Career Change Dogs” and are wonderful dogs that make loving pets and companions, they just prefer not to work. No dogs are ever returned to shelters. Dogs for the Deaf has a lifetime commitment to all of our dogs.

Q: If the dogs are free, how do you get your funding?
A: We are totally funded by donations from individuals, service clubs, groups of all kinds, and some businesses and corporations. We also encourage individuals to include Dogs for the Deaf in their estate planning. Leaving a bequest to Dogs for the Deaf in your will or trust can leave a legacy that will help for generations to come. We do not get any government funding for our organization.

Q: What does it cost to sponsor a dog?
A: Sponsorship opportunities reflect the expense of rescuing, training, placement, and follow-up. We are offering 3 different levels of dog sponsorships. When the dog is placed, the sponsor is recognized as the sponsor in any publicity and receives a picture of the dog and information about the dog and recipient. To learn more, click HERE.

Q: What is the actual average investment per dog?
A: Our average investment per dog – from rescuing the dog in the shelter, all the medical work to get the dog in top physical condition, the 4-6 months of training, the placement expenses, and the lifetime follow up support for 10-12 years or more, plus assisting the client at the end of the dog’s life – averages $25,000.00 to $27,000.00 per dog. This is a lot of money, and we do everything we can to keep the costs as low as possible and still maintain our high standards and quality. However, when you think of the lifesaving and life enhancing benefits of these dogs and the service they provide, it is worth a lot more.

Q: How long will the dog work as an Assistance Dog and what happens to them when they’re retired?
A: It could be anywhere from 8-12 years. We let the dogs decide when they are ready to retire. When the dog does retire, it can stay with the recipient, go to live with a friend or relative, or come back to us and we will place it in a loving home as a Career Change Dog.

Q: How can we help Dogs for the Deaf?
A: Of course, financial support is very important, and you can help by making donations to Dogs for the Deaf. Donations of all sizes are very helpful and greatly appreciated. You can also help spread the word about the services Dogs for the Deaf provides – saving dogs and helping people. Telling friends, relatives, and business associates about Dogs for the Deaf will increase the number of people who know about this very special organization. You could also put on a fundraiser in your local community and send the proceeds to Dogs for the Deaf. Visit the Support Us section of the website for more information about all of the different ways that YOU can help!

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